November 22 National Housing Day

NATIONAL HOUSING DAY: CALL TO ACTION

(Download poster here: 
http://www.shjn.ca/wp-content/uploads/2022/10/SHJN-tabloid.pdf)

SAVE THE DATE: NOVEMBER 22, 2022 – 12PM.
DAVID CROMBIE PARK, Toronto  (Baseball Diamond at Sherbourne/Esplanade)

Housing in Canada is deeply unaffordable and the crisis escalates everyday. Across the country from Kingston to Vancouver, Iqaluit to Montreal, people are being priced out of rental stock, losing their housing and sleeping in tents, bus shelters and ravines because they cannot access housing or shelter. In Toronto a state of emergency ensues.  80,000 HOUSEHOLDS ARE ON THE WAITING LIST FOR SOCIAL HOUSING while 138 people a day are denied access to emergency shelters because shelters are at capacity. In 2021, the December ‘Toronto Homeless Memorial’ recorded the highest number of homeless deaths per month to date. Despite the dangerous shortage of shelter spaces and the dire lack of affordable housing, the City is planning to close shelter-hotels and continues to attack and displace encampment residents.

 

We must fight back!!

 

November 22 is National Housing Day. The Shelter and Housing Justice Network (SHJN) is calling for a mass rally to send a loud message to all levels of government: leaving people to suffer and die from lack of shelter and housing can not be allowed to continue. All level of governments MUST build social housing now!

 

If you care about your unhoused neighbour –

If you are struggling to afford housing yourself –

If you don’t want to let people freeze to death on our streets –

 

Come out and show your support on Tuesday November 22 at David Crombie Park (baseball diamond, at the corner of Sherbourne and Esplanade). 

Lunch will be served at 11:45am with speakers, entertainment and rally to follow at noon. We will unite demanding the following:   http://www.shjn.ca/rally-for-housing/national-day-for-housing-our-demands/

 

The St. Lawrence Neighbourhood is a success story around the world. It was built when Canada still had a fully funded National Housing Program. The Co-ops, supportive housing and public housing units are homes for thousands of people. Today, the only signs of new housing in the community are cranes that are building unaffordable condos.